Mental Health

person with long brown hair with a pride flag wrapped around their shoulders

Therapy has helped me unpack years’ worth of trauma and identity issues that plagued me for so long. I am not perfect, I still struggle with disordered eating habits, specifically when I feel lost and out of control within my life.

sunset over the mountains

Therefore, this bucket, dearest friends, is for filling with small sacred things and breathtaking experiences when you’re out and about, and carving out existing outside your comfort zone(s); like watching the sun sleepily wave good morning and goodnight in red hues again and again, hearing your best friend’s deep reaching belly laughter, and thinking about all the warm blanketing hugs you are still yet to receive.

Sometimes the steps back are necessary because it gives you a birds eye view into your own life in ways that can help to gauge what is working and what is not. It helps to illuminate the various different directions that have still yet to be discovered.

Our very first Celebrate EveryBODY fundraisers come and gone. The event which held on June 9, was a success and proof that we need a body positive and inclusive community. 

Family holidays can be an incredibly stressful if you’re struggling with your eating or body image. Family, food, weather, gifts, shopping…every day seems to bring some new activity, crisis, joy or obligation. So how do you navigate these unpredictable times of year?

Anxious? Stressed? Lonely? Learn to knit. Recent research has found that knitting has psychological and social benefits. People who knit are calmer, happier, and feel better about themselves.

Setting boundaries and learning to say no is critically important during recovery. Being assertive, openly expressing yourself and setting boundaries takes away a lot of ED’s power.

Whether you’re just starting down the recovery path or you’re long asymptomatic, healing is a long and difficult process that can leave you completely exhausted. Especially when you’ve been in recovery for some time and you’ve heard the same things over and over again, it’s easy to feel like there is nothing new to learn. What I’ve learned over the years is that there is always something new to learn and healing tends to come into fits and bursts.

One the most important habits I developed that helped me through the worst of my eating disorder and still helps me today is a small routine- a time during the day that I spend with myself, doing the things that are most important to my health and to my happiness.

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